Posts Tagged ‘UFC 116’

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Props: KFAN in Minneapolis (via Sports Radio Interviews)

Quoteworthy:

“I took a good ass-whupping in the first round and made a Rocky comeback in the second … Before the fight [Josh Rosenthal] comes into the locker room and he says listen fellas if things get ugly out there I’m gonna give you three warnings before I stop the fight. I’m gonna be very verbal in this so you gotta show some movement and show you’re still in the fight. I knew in my mind there was a time I thought you know what? It’s raining punches here and I don’t know where to go. If I move I’m gonna create an opening but I have to move to stay in the fight. You gotta do what you gotta do you know?”

UFC Heavyweight Champion Brock Lesnar recalls the danger he was in prior to his stunning second round submission win over Shane Carwin in the UFC 116 main event. Lesnar somehow survived 60 punches to the head in the opening stanza, getting dropped and then completely overwhelmed with 5XL fists of fury for about four straight minutes. There were numerous times that Rosenthal could have stepped in, but didn’t, giving Lesnar the benefit of the doubt and giving way to perhaps the most improbable come-from-behind finish in the history of the promotion. Anyone out there thinking that Lesnar, who is a pay-per-view cash cow, got special treatment? Or was it just a (rare) case of superb officiating?

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No good deed goes unpunished: Ricardo Romero gets his broken jaw wired shut after big UFC 116 win over Seth Petruzelli. He also sustained a sprained knee and severely-strained pec muscle … all on round one. Ouch.

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Fight Gallery:UFC 116

Posted: July 5, 2010 in Fight Gallery
Tags: ,

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CompuStrike Results for Lesnar vs Carwin held in LAS VEGAS, NV on 07/03/2010

Heavyweights – UFC

Winner: Lesnar

By Submission in Round 2

Fight Time: Standing Time (3:01) Ground Time (4:18)

Final Stats

Brock Lesnar
Shane Carwin
25/35
Total Strikes Landed/Thrown
58/104
71%
Percentage
56%
4/9
Total Arm Strikes Landed/Thrown
9/22
44%
Percentage
41%
3
Power Strikes Landed
8
1
Clinch Strikes Landed
1
3/3
Total Leg Strikes Landed/Thrown
2/5
100%
Percentage
40%
0
Kicks Landed
0
3
Knees Landed
2
18/23
Ground Strikes Landed/Thrown
47/77
78%
Percentage
61%
1/4
Takedowns/Attempts
0/0
1
Submission Attempts
0
0
Knockdowns
0

Props: UFC.com

Quoteworthy:

“It’s never happened before. Nobody has fought this close together in the UFC and I won them both. It’s just a reflection of the support group, the team I have around me. This is crazy, I mean Wanderlei Silva got hurt, I stepped in and I fought one of the toughest guys in the world. I’m just so excited. The fact of the matter is I just beat Wanderlei Silva’s opponent. I think I should have him next. I think they should put us both on the (TUF) show, let us battle it out on the show, then put us in the cage and let us battle it out there.”

An emotional and obviously excited Chris Leben caps off the greatest two weeks of his career by submitting highly-regarded Yoshihiro Akiyama at UFC 116: “Lesnar vs. Carwin” on July 3 in Las Vegas. After finishing Aaron Simpson at the June 16 TUF 11 Finale, “The Crippler” was flown in as a late replacement for the injured Wanderlei Silva, who was expected to face “Sexyama” in the co-main event. Now Leben holds the “W” over “The Axe Murderer’s” foe and believes that earned him a spot against the dangerous Brazilian. Anyone disagree?

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“He hit me pretty good, and I don’t know, I ended up there on the ground. I just had to go into survival mode and stay busy. I really have to thank the referee for allowing that thing to go on. I wasn’t hurt. I thought if I just kept moving — I could feel Shane’s punches getting less and less — and I thought, well, if I can get out of here then I’m just going to exert a lot energy. I realized there was [not a lot of time left], so I just tried to stay busy. He’s a beast. He definitely won the first round [laughs].”

— Undisputed UFC Heavyweight Champion Brock Lesnar is quick to thank the “Man in Charge of the Octagon,” Josh Rosenthal, shortly after his stunning second round submission win over Shane Carwin in the UFC 116 main event. Lesnar somehow survived a gorilla attack in the opening stanza, getting dropped and then completely overwhelmed with 5XL fists of fury for about four straight minutes. There were numerous times that Rosenthal could have stepped in, but didn’t, giving Lesnar the benefit of the doubt and giving way to perhaps the most improbable come-from-behind finish in the history of the promotion. It wasn’t the fact that Lesnar was able to rebound — although that in and of itself was impressive — but rather the way in which he did it. With his sheer size and strength, now coupled with a decent jiu-jitsu arsenal to go along with his already stellar ground game, is there anyone who can stop the Lesnar ‘frate’ train? Whoever it is might want to think about bringing a sledgehammer into the cage — Carwin hit him with everything but the kitchen sink and he still hung in there. Would you have stopped it?

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Props: Fighter’s Only

Quoteworthy:

“I went through a very tense and difficult weekend and had a very hard decision. Two weeks ago I felt pain in my knee while I was training wrestling. I had an MRI of my knee and three doctors told me my knee was torn. I took medicine to help with the pain, and although my knee felt loose, I said ‘no,’ this date is very important to me and I continued training. Last Friday, during sparring, I injured my rib. It was very painful and the next day I had an x-ray and an MRI. I discovered I had three broken ribs. After years of fighting, my body made me stop this time. This is a very, very, very hard moment for me. This was a fight I really, really desired. You cannot imagine how much I wanted to fight on this card. It was my birthday, I had friends and family from Brazil and around the world coming to see me and now I cannot fight. I apologize to my opponent. I hope that I can fight with you in the future. You are an amazing fighter.”

A battered and remorseful Wanderlei Silva comments on the recent injuries suffered in training camp that ultimately led to his withdrawal from the UFC 116 co-main event against Yoshihiro Akiyama on July 3. “The Axe Murderer” has enjoyed a long and successful career even prior to his run with the UFC, but are the years of abuse finally catching up to him? While he’s listed as 33-years-old, he may carry double that in fight years. Are we seeing the beginning of the end? Or is this just a minor bump in the road en route to another run through the middleweight division?